Peanut Butter Banana Bread

I’m surprised to say that I went on a bit of a baking kick this past weekend. Okay, I’m not really that surprised given my strong affinity for anything sweet, but with the holidays you would have thought I’d gotten my fill.

I made one of my favorite snack recipes, Pumpkin Crunch. It’s sort of a pumpkin seed granola with dried fruit and spices. I use dried cherries in this recipe in place of the cranberries. The house smells fabulous when the pepitas are roasting in the oven!

On Sunday I realized that I’d better make use of the last two very ripe bananas sitting on my counter or freeze them for later. I remembered seeing a recipe for Peanut Butter Banana Bread in my October issue of Cooking Light magazine and I thought this would be a great way to finish off the last of my bananas.

I made some changes based on what I had available in the house. Their recipe called for 1 1/2 cups of mashed banana, but I only had enough to fill one cup so I added 4 oz. of applesauce to keep it moist. I also used low-fat vanilla yogurt in place of the plain yogurt so the batter was likely a bit sweeter. I also left out the ground flax seed and peanuts chopped peanuts because I enjoy a soft texture without the added crunch in quick breads. I only keep skim milk on hand so I used that instead of the 1% called for in the glaze and it worked just fine.

Even with less mashed banana the bread had good strong banana flavor and moistness (I think the applesauce helped there). The peanut butter flavor really came through in the glaze and really put this one over the top. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did!

Here’s my version of the recipe:

Peanut Butter Banana Bread

Adapted from Cooking Light

Yield: 16 servings (serving size: 1 slice)

Bread:

  • 1 cup mashed ripe banana
  • 4oz. applesauce
  • 1/3 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt
  • 1/3 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 6.75 ounces all-purpose flour (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
  • Cooking spray

Glaze:

  • 1/3 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon skim milk
  • 1 tablespoon creamy peanut butter

1. Preheat oven to 350°. 2. Combine banana through eggs in a large bowl and beat with a mixer at medium speed. Add both sugars and beat until blended. 3. Weigh or lightly spoon flour into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Combine flour and next 5 ingredients (through allspice) in a small bowl. Add flour mixture to banana mixture and beat just until blended. Pour batter into a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350° for 1 hour and 5 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Remove from oven; cool 10 minutes in pan on a wire rack. Remove bread from pan; cool. 4. To prepare glaze, combine powdered sugar, milk, and 1 tablespoon peanut butter in a small bowl, stirring with a whisk. Drizzle glaze over bread.

Frita Batidos, Ann Arbor, MI

Eve Aronoff, who made a brief appearance on the TV show Top Chef, opened a second restaurant in Ann Arbor last month. Frita Batidos is Cuban inspired and geared toward a more casual crowd than her restaurant in Kerrytown, Eve. Customers order at at the counter and then choose to sit at a bar style counter or share one of the picnic tables with other guests while they wait for staff to call out their name and run the food over.

My husband and I stopped in for lunch. I ordered the Beef Frita, a beef patty on a brioche bun with sweet chili mayo and topped with fries; I added a slice of Muenster cheese as well.  I  also chose a strawberry flavored tropical soda. The burger was on the small side, but very juicy and flavorful. The shoestring fries on top of the burger was a change for me, but I enjoyed them. They were still soft and full of potato flavor. The sweet chili mayo was delicious, but not especially spicy. Despite the high quality of the ingredients I did find the overall value a little low at $9 for an small elevated cheeseburger that didn’t include anything else. The soda was made with seltzer water and syrup. The drink was a bit heavy on the sweetness for my taste and a little lacking on the bubbles. It might appeal more to the kids in the crowd.

My husband ordered the Cuban Sloppy Joe which he found to be tasty, but more of a loose meat sandwich than a sloppy joe as the limited amount of sauce, also the sweet chili mayo, kept it from being especially messy. The spices gave the sandwich a nice depth that you don’t get from your traditional Manwich.

After enjoying our sandwiches we decided to give dessert a try. We settled on the fried plantains coated in cinnamon sugar. I am a big plantain fan, but found these to be a little short on plantain flavor and overwhelmed by the cinnamon sugar. The starchiness of the thick cut plantains also got to be a bit much after a few bites and it would have benefited from another texture to cut through it, like ice cream.

Presentation of our food was fun, everything came served on a banana leaf! Both our sandwiches and dessert came out quickly. Staff for the most part were very friendly and enthusiastic with the exception of one gentleman at the counter who seemed to wish he was somewhere else.

I wonder if the community tables will work in the long run. The day we were in was not especially busy, but it can be a little uncomfortable to share your meal at at picnic table next to a stranger. For more a more outgoing crowd it could be fun to chat up new people on each visit though!

The other observation I had was the Frita Batidos breakfast menu. They have a lot of interesting options from Cuban omelets, mango French toast and even potato nachos, but the prices for breakfast are even steeper than the lunch choices. Shouldn’t prices generally go up throughout the day rather than down? I’m not sure I can stomach $4 for bread and jam or $12 for French toast.

I also saw a lot of interesting Cuban coffees and shakes that I didn’t get a chance to try on this visit. I’m especially interested in the ones that use cajeta, or goat’s milk caramel. We may have to see if the early morning prices change, but we’ll certainly be back for lunch!

Thai Thai, Ypsilanti, MI

I was happy to finally get a chance to try out the Thai Thai restaurant in Ypsilanti this week. I had heard several people comment on the good quality of their food and had seen a lot of positive reviews online as well. In past attempts to call in a carryout order they were closed, but the other night I was finally successful!

I chose the #17 – Gai Pad Prig Haeng, or cashew chicken. My dinner included white rice, grilled chicken breast, chili peppers, green and white onion in a sweet and salty brown sauce. I am sort of a connoisseur of cashew chicken at Thai restaurants, it’s my favorite dish. This one stacked up quite well. My favorite is still Lotus Thai in Ann Arbor, but this one was pretty similar. The flavors in the sauce were like the one at Lotus, but the dish was missing mushrooms, which I really like and may request next time I order it at Thai Thai. Although the single asterisk on the menu next to the dish number indicates it to be “mild” I’d argue that it may be a medium spice level for the non-experienced. Personally, I enjoyed the spiciness.

I found it a little odd that they don’t give potential customers easy access to their carryout menu. The links in this blog post will take you to their menu on Facebook but I found even that hard to find initially and they don’t have a website. When I picked up my order I asked for a take-out menu, but they don’t have one available and just mentioned that its available online. So, if you’re interested in trying them out, click one of the links in this post to find Thai Thai’s online menu and don’t give up if the first few times you call they are closed despite the early hour. My first taste says it’s worth the effort.

Squares Restaurant, Ann Arbor, MI

I met some friends for lunch at the newly opened Squares Restaurant in downtown Ann Arbor last week. The restaurant specializes in “Signature Squares” which are housemade white or wheat flatbread with vegetables and/or meat toppings. They also serve salads, a number of housemade side dishes and even breakfast.

They have an order-at-the-counter setup, but it’s slightly unusual. I ordered from a friendly staff member at one end of the counter and when I pulled out my wallet to pay was told that customers pay at the end of the counter. They had us find a table first and wait for our names to be called when our order was ready before they rang us up. While everyone was helpful, I like to order and pay at the same time at a non-table service restaurant. Maybe they’re still figuring that one out.

I had the veggie square with a side of their butternut squash. Although the website features images that showcase most of their squares as open faced sandwiches, mine arrived as a wrap with a side of fresh grapes and an orange slice. The whole wheat flatbread, sun-dried tomato sauce and grilled vegetables, including zucchini, onion, peppers, and mozzarella were really delicious! I did have to peal the foil down from around the sandwich and it was a bit messy to eat. It might work a little better if the flatbreads were served open face as shown in the website photos as I found myself using a knife and fork by the end of my meal. The butternut squash was roasted with cranberries, brown sugar and orange juice added. The flavors were good, but the texture of the squash was on the fibrous side, I prefer my pureed squash smoother. I did snatch some of the broasted potatoes from a friend at the table. They had excellent seasoning and potato taste and were nicely crisped slices. I’ll make those my side dish next time!

Overall, our visit to Squares Restaurant was a very good experience. The staff was very friendly and both the chef and manager checked with our table to see how we were enjoying ourselves during our lunch. Prices are reasonable; my flatbread, side and drink came to a little over $8 with tax.

Pumpkin Pie Cheesecake

I came across a recipe for Pumpkin Pie Cheesecake when looking for ways to use up some leftover canned pumpkin in my fridge. I am personally not a big cheesecake fan, but the description indicated that it would taste more like pumpkin pie with extra creaminess so I was happy to give it a go.

As promised, the filling had a very pumpkin-pie-like flavor, but with a smoother consistency, which I really liked. It was also a hit with my husband, who is both a pumpkin pie and cheesecake fan all-around.

I made some adaptations to the recipe based on what I had on hand. I substituted low-fat cinnamon graham crackers for standard crumbs in the crust. I used only 1/3 less-fat cream cheese in place of the original combination of fat-free cream cheese and 1/3 less-fat cream cheese. The recipe also called for an 8-inch springform pan, but I used a 10-inch tart pan with a removable bottom and adjusted the cooking time a bit to compensate. I had worried that the filling might overflow because of the shallower pan so I put it on a cookie sheet just in case, but there were no spills.

I think this one will make a great addition to your holiday table. Enjoy!

Pumpkin Pie Cheesecake

Adapted from Cooking Light

Yield: 8 servings

  • cooking spray
  • 3/4 cup low-fat cinnamon graham cracker crumbs ( about 4 sheets)
  • 1/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 12 oz. 1/3-less-fat cream cheese
  • 1 cup canned pumpkin
  • 2 tablespoons reduced-fat sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 2 large eggs
  • reduced fat whipped cream

Preheat the oven to 325°. Coat an 10-inch removable tart pan with cooking spray, and press bottom of pan evenly with crumbs. Combine the sugars and cream cheese in a large bowl; beat with a mixer at medium speed until smooth. Add pumpkin and next 9 ingredients (through eggs), and beat well. Pour the cream cheese mixture into prepared pan. Bake at 325° for 45 minutes or until center is just set. Turn oven off, and partially open the oven door. Cool cheesecake in the oven for 60 minutes. Remove cheesecake from oven, and cover. Refrigerate at least 8 hours or overnight. Serve with whipped cream.

Fattoush Grill, Ypsilanti, MI

The new Middle Eastern restaurant at Washtenaw and Hewitt in Ypsilanti, Fattoush Grill, opened in the former Tio’s building back in October. They don’t have a website yet and I couldn’t find a menu online so I picked up a carryout menu a couple of weeks ago.
Yesterday I ordered the meat shawarma (slow-roasted shaved marinated lamb pieces) lunch combo for take-out. It came with hummous and pita bread, a choice of soup or salad and rice or fries for $6.99. I had the traditional Middle Eastern salad which was very refreshing. The lettuce was impeccably clean and the white onions were crisp and mild. The simple lemon juice and olive oil dressing with herb seasonings was light and delicious. The rice had a few slivers of toasted almonds for a nice crunch. I must say that I absolutely loved Fatthoush Grill’s version of hommous and I am usually not a hummous fan at all. There version is a little different from most Middle Eastern restaurants because they blend the chickpeas with fava beans and tahini sauce for a much smoother texture and it had a great citrusy flavor. The meat was seasoned well and tasted good despite the fact that it was pretty dry.

Overall, I really enjoyed the food. I’m hoping that the dry meat was just a fluke this time and I can look forward to more tender meat in the future.

Skillet, Columbus, OH

When my husband and I have a trip planned to visit family in Columbus I always scour the web for new ideas on places to eat. I love the opportunity to try out some place new when we get the opportunity. I read quite a few positive reviews of a new restaurant in German Village called Skillet and put it on my list of must-try spots on our Thanksgiving trip. They refer to their style of food as rustic and urban, sort of seasonal local food with a twist. They serve lunch and dinner during the week and brunch all day on the weekends.

It worked out for us to have breakfast there on the day we left town. I had the Shredded Apple and Farmer’s Cheese Pancakes with maple syrup and a glass of locally pressed sweet apple cider. For the pancakes they use a vanilla batter and fold in Honeycrisp apples (my favorite variety!) and farmer’s cheese. I really loved the flavor and texture of the pancakes. The outside was had slightly crisp edges and a soft fluffy center. Because the cheese is so mild it added pockets of melted texture rather than a heavy cheese flavor. Although the pancakes were very tasty I was a bit disappointed that there was very little apple flavor and more of the vanilla. I’m assuming that the apple was probably shredded and created a moister pancake instead of adding a strong apple taste.

My husband ordered the Rustic Traditional Breakfast plate with eggs, fingerling potatoes and pork sausage. He really enjoyed his breakfast as well. I sampled the potatoes and the heritage Tamworth sausage, both of which had a lot of great fresh herb flavor. The fingerlings well seasoned and cooked perfectly with crisp edges. The sausage was full of flavor and wasn’t greasy. The dish also came with a croissant, the only shortcoming of Skillet. It was dry and tasted like a store-bought pastry.

I had heard that it can be a long wait to get a table here, but the day we were in it was pretty quiet. Maybe that was because of the holiday weekend or the Michigan/Ohio State game that afternoon. Either way I was really happy with our waiter who was extremely attentive and personable. The restaurant is small, but quaint and the food was very good. We’ll definitely be back.